Monthly Archives: April 2012

Tai Chi How To: Knee Exercise to Quickly Release Knee Pain and Stiffness

Tai chi exercise is powerful way to gently release knee stiffness, knee pain and injury.  But as teaching was passed on in the Chinese healing arts & martial arts, many tai chi and qigong exercises got misunderstood or lost important details.  One misconception is that you need to “loosen the knees.” Bookmark on Delicious Digg…

How to Do a Tai Chi Twine Step – Too Many Get This Wrong. Do it right and get health & martial benefits.

Are you sure you’re doing your tai chi moves as best as possible?  Proper twine steps will load a tremendous amount of energy into your kua.  You can use that energy for effortless and speedy change of direction, invigorating and powerful tai chi kicks, or just absorb it into your body to enhance your qi….

Master Jou’s Secret of Tai Chi Flexibility – Multiple Health & Rejuvenation Benefits

Grandmaster Jou was famous for his uncanny youthfulness at an advanced age and after conquering a history of illness.  Here we go over his special daoyin taiji diagram stretch that he only taught in his chan si jin workshop.  This stretch works very fast to increase your leg flexibility and spinal health.  It also has…

Yang Tai Chi Application for White Crane Spreads Wings

The Yang Style Taijiquan (tai chi chuan) martial application for White Crane Spreads Wings is shown in the video below. Filmed at Internal Gardens School of Classical Tai Chi Chuan, featuring Shifu Loretta Wollering. Click onward to see the video. Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook Share on Linkedin share via Reddit…

2 Tai Chi Applications for Lazily Tying Coat and Why One is Better Than the Other

The 3rd posture of Chen 1 tai chi is called Lazily Tying Coat.  Let’s look at 2 martial applications for this & why the popular application is not as effective as the one promoted here.  This is from Master Jou Tsung Hwa’s expression of the Xinjia Chen First Routine Taiijiquan (tai chi chuan).  Click on…

In Tai Chi, Avoid the Misapplication of “Relax” (w/ video)

A typical tai chi class: the instructor admonishes his students, “Relax!”  They go ahead and do what they think is “relax.”  And here’s where the trouble begins. Ask a roomful of people what the opposite of tension is and you’ll get the unanimous reply, “Relaxation.”  At first consideration, this indeed makes sense.  But then ask…